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Posts Tagged ‘wild oats community garden’

The Cutie Pie in front of the community herb garden at the WOCOG.

The Cutie Pie in front of the community herb garden at the WOCOG.

Here we ate lunch together after the gardening was done. So peaceful!

Here we ate lunch together after the gardening was done. So peaceful!

I love bees on sunflowers.

I love bees on sunflowers.

In a neighboring plot. God's glory in an iris!

In a neighboring plot. God's glory in an iris!

The Cutie Pie weeding.

The Cutie Pie weeding.

Carrot tops, bunching onions, cherry tomato plants exploding from the side.

Carrot tops, bunching onions, cherry tomato plants exploding from the side.

Check out all those cherry tomatoes! Can you count them down to the flowers?

Check out all those cherry tomatoes! Can you count them down to the flowers?

Yesterday we went to tend our garden plot at Wild Oats Community Organic Garden (Long Beach). I have a small plot there, and my mom started a plot right next to mine. I planted carrots, radishes, green bunching onions, and cherry tomato plants. The watermelon sprouts I planted vanished (dried upl, probably) within a couple days, which is good because the cherry tomatoes have completely taken over the space that had been allotted to the melons!!

One thing that worked well: mycorrhizae spores I got in a powder form from Paul Stamet’s fascinating company, “Fungi Perfecti!” The product is called MycoGrow, and it’s not expensive. It’s not a synthetic fertilizer–it’s natural underground fungal spores that are amazingly designed by God to just stay underground and form a symbiotic relationship with the roots of your plants! I love this stuff. I sprinkled in about a 1/2 teaspoon into each little hole just before inserting a seedling into the plot, and it does an amazing job of conserving water, warding off disease and pests, and improving nutrient transport to the roots. This is the first time I’ve used it, and I am amazed at the quality of my onions, radishes and tomatoes! My cherry tomatoes look like regular tomato plants in how long and gangly and enormously productive they are! But they’re still the size of cherry tomatoes (so far!). And, since it’s hard to tell from the photo, I counted 17 cherry tomato-sproutings from just one branch on this plant. That’s if you count from the first green tomato down to the last flower. 17!!! And it’s still growing strong, so it will probably produce quite a few more flowers there. When I planted cherry tomatoes in containers 2 summers ago, I think I got about 6 per branch.

My mom's garden plot (mine's beyond hers). Someone's waving at you!

My mom's garden plot (mine's beyond hers). Someone's waving at you!

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